Natural Born Citizen – A Place to Ask Questions and Get the Right Answers

October 11, 2010

New Ad – Kerchner v Obama Petition for Writ of Certiorari filed with the U.S. Supreme Court – Washington Times National Weekly edition – pg 5

New Ad – Kerchner et al v Obama/Congress/Pelosi et al Petition for Writ of Certiorari filed with the U.S. Supreme Court – Washington Times National Weekly edition – 11 Oct 2010 issue, page 5. U.S. Supreme Court Docket Number: 10-446

Obama was born a British Subject and is still such to this day. Obama is NOT a “natural born Citizen” to constitutional standards. Obama has never conclusively proved he was born in Hawaii. Obama’s paternal family in Kenya, Kenyan government officials, and newspapers in Kenya say he was born in Kenya. Obama’s maternal grandmother likely falsely and illegally registered him as born in Hawaii to get him, her new foreign-born grandson, U.S. Citizenship.

Link to read and download newest ad: http://www.scribd.com/doc/39077602/Kerchner-v-Obama-Congress-Pelosi-Petition-for-Writ-of-Certiorari-filed-with-U-S-Supreme-Court

History shows us that a popularly elected, but ineligible, chief executive in the executive branch of a government can be legally and constitutionally removed from office, e.g., Governor Thomas H. Moodie of North Dakota was a prime example. After he was sworn in and serving as Governor, the North Dakota State Supreme Court ordered Governor Moodie removed from office, after it was determined that he was constitutionally and legally ineligible to serve in the office to which he was popularly elected.

http://history.nd.gov/exhibits/governors/governors19.html

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A request from CDR Kerchner:

Also, please cast your votes to Help the Cause to get the word out:

1st: Vote for the show topic for the Judge Andrew Napolitano “Freedom Watch” TV show to be a discussion of the legal term of art, “natural born Citizenship”. Please add your vote (in addition to making a comment if desired) for this new TV Show topic suggested by JTX at the Judge Andrew Napolitano “Freedom Watch” TV show suggestion forum. Go to this link and click on the VOTE button and cast 3 of your 10 votes for the show topic to be “natural born Citizenship”. Don’t just make a comment only. That does not count as a vote. Be sure to VOTE too: http://freedomwatch.uservoice.com/forums/16625-freedom-watch-show-ideas/suggestions/969299-natural-born-citizen-meaning-in-natural-law-s?ref=title

2nd: Vote for Mario to be a guest on Judge Andrew Napolitano’s Freedom Watch TV show: Please add your vote here (in addition to making a comment if desired) to get Attorney Mario Apuzzo on the air with the Judge Andrew Napolitano to discuss this issue. Go to this link and click on the VOTE button and cast 3 of your 10 votes for Mario Apuzzo. Don’t just make a comment only. That does not count as a vote. Be sure to VOTE too: http://freedomwatch.uservoice.com/forums/16626-freedom-watch-guest-suggestions/suggestions/268573-mario-apuzzo-esq-

Charles F. Kerchner, Jr., Commander USNR (Retired)
Lead Plaintiff, Kerchner v Obama & Congress
Please if you can, visit this site and help the cause:
http://www.protectourliberty.org/
####

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October 10, 2010

A Sampling of Some Quotes about the U.S. Constitution from History

A Sampling of Some
Quotes about the U.S.
Constitution from History

Quotes Source: http://www.constitution.org/cons/const_quotes.htm

The following is a sampling of some quotes from history which make some very important points about the principles of constitutional republican government:

1. The Constitution was written to be understood by the voters; its words and phrases were used in their normal and ordinary, as distinguished from technical meaning; where the intention is clear, there is no room for construction, and no excuse for interpolation or addition. — Martin v. Hunter’s Lessee, 1 Wheat 304; Gibbons v. Ogden, 9 Wheat 419; Brown v. Maryland, 12 Wheat 419; Craig v. Missouri, 4 Pet 10; Tennessee v. Whitworth, 117 U.S. 139; Lake County v. Rollins, 130 U.S. 662; Hodges v. United States, 203 U.S. 1; Edwards v. Cuba R. Co., 268 U.S. 628; The Pocket Veto Case, 279 U.S. 655; (Justice) Story on the Constitution, 5th ed., Sec 451; Cooley’s Constitutional Limitations, 2nd ed., p. 61, 70.

2. It cannot be presumed that any clause in the constitution is intended to be without effect;… — Marbury v. Madison, 5 U.S. 137, 174 (1803).

3. The Constitution is a written instrument. As such, its meaning does not alter. That which it meant when it was adopted, it means now. — South Carolina v. United States, 199 U.S. 437, 448 (1905).

4. In the United States, Sovereignty resides in the people, who act through the organs established by the Constitution. — Chisholm v. Georgia, 2 Dall 419, 471; Penhallow v. Doane’s Administrators, 3 Dall 54, 93; McCullock v. Maryland, 4 Wheat 316, 404, 405; Yick Yo Hopkins, 118 U.S. 356, 370.

5. The necessities which gave birth to the constitution, the controversies which precede its formation and the conflicts of opinion which were settled by its adoption, may properly be taken into view for the purposes of tracing to its source, any particular provision of the constitution, in order thereby, to be enabled to correctly interpret its meaning. — Pollock v. Farmers’ Loan & Trust Co., 157 U.S. 429, 558.

6. The values of the Framers of the Constitution must be applied in any case construing the Constitution. Inferences from the text and history of the Constitution should be given great weight in discerning the original understanding and in determining the intentions of those who ratified the constitution. The precedential value of cases and commentators tends to increase, therefore, in proportion to their proximity to the adoption of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, or any other amendments. — Powell v. McCormack, 395 U.S. 486, 547 (1969).

7. To disregard such a deliberate choice of words and their natural meaning, would be a departure from the first principle of constitutional interpretation. “In expounding the Constitution of the United States,” said Chief Justice Taney in Holmes v. Jennison, 14 U.S. 540, 570-1, “every word must have its due force and appropriate meaning; for it is evident from the whole instrument, that, no word was unnecessarily used, or needlessly added. The many discussions which have taken place upon the construction of the Constitution, have proved the correctness of this proposition; and shown the high talent, the caution and the foresight of the illustrious men who framed it. Every word appears to have been weighed with the utmost deliberation and its force and effect to have been fully understood. — Wright v. United States, 302 U.S. 583 (1938).

8. The courts are not bound by mere forms, nor are they to be misled by mere pretences. They are at liberty — indeed, are under a solemn duty — to look at the substance of things, whenever they enter upon the inquiry whether the legislature has transcended the limits of its authority. If therefore, a statute purporting to have been enacted to protect the public health, the public morals, or the public safety, has no real or substantial relation to those objects, or is a palpable invasion of rights secured by the fundamental law, it is the duty of thye courts to so adjudge, and thereby give effect to the Constitution. — Mugler v. Kansas, 123 U.S. 623, 661.

9. Constitutional provisions for the security of person and property should be liberally construed. It is the duty of the courts to be watchful of constitutional rights against any stealthy encroachments thereon. — Boyd v. U.S., 116 U.S. 635.

10. It cannot be assumed that the framers of the constitution and the people who adopted it, did not intend that which is the plain import of the language used. When the language of the constitution is positive and free of all ambiguity, all courts are not at liberty, by a resort to the refinements of legal learning, to restrict its obvious meaning to avoid the hardships of particular cases. We must accept the constitution as it reads when its language is unambiguous, for it is the mandate of the sovereign power. — Cook vs. Iverson, 122, N.M. 251.

11. Where the words of a constitution are unambiguous and in their commonly received sense lead to a reasonable conclusion, it should be read according to the natural and most obvious import of the framers, without resorting to subtle and forced construction for the purpose of limiting or extending its operation. — A State Ex Rel. Torryson v. Grey, 21 Nev. 378, 32 P. 190.

12. If the legislature clearly misinterprets a constitutional provision, the frequent repitition of the wrong will not create a right. — Amos v. Mosley, 74 Fla. 555; 77 So. 619.

13. A long and uniform sanction by law revisers and lawmakers, of a legislative assertion and exercise of power, is entitled to a great weight in construing an ambiguous or doubtful provision, but is entitled to no weight if the statute in question is in conflict with the plain meaning of the constitutional provision. — Kingsley v. Merril, 122 Wis. 185; 99 NW 1044.

14. Economic necessity cannot justify a disregard of cardinal constitutional guarantee. — Riley v. Carter, 165 Okal. 262; 25 P. 2d 666; 79 ALR 1018.

15. Disobedience or evasion of a constitutional mandate may not be tolerated, even though such disobedience may, at least temporarily, promote in some respects the best interests of the public. — State v. Board of Examiners, 274 N.Y. 367; 9 NE 2d 12; 112 ALR 660.

16. When any court violates the clean and unambiguous language of the Constitution, a fraud is perpetrated and no one is bound to obey it. — (See 16 Ma. Jur. 2d 177, 178) State v. Sutton, 63 Minn. 147, 65 NW 262, 30 L.R.A. 630 Am. St. 459.

17. I cannot subscribe to the omnipotence of a state legislature, or that it is absolute and without control; although its authority should not be expressly restrained by the Constitution, or fundamental law, of the state. The nature, and ends of legislative power will limit the exercise of it. This fundamental principle flows from the very nature of our free Republican governments, that no man should be compelled to do what the laws do not require, nor to refrain from acts which the laws permit. There are acts which the Federal, or State, Legislature cannot do, without exceeding their authority. There are certain vital principles in our free Republican governments, which will determine and overrule an apparent and flagrant abuse of legislative power; as to authorize manifest injustice by positive law; or to take away that security for personal liberty, or private property, for the protection whereof the government was established. An Act of the legislature (for I cannot call it a law) contrary to the great first principles of the social compact, cannot be considered a rightful exercise of legislative authority. The obligation of a law in governments established on express compact, and on republican principles, must be determined by the nature of the power, on which it is founded. A few instances will suffice to explain what I mean. A law that punishes a citizen for an innocent action, or, in other words, for an act, which, when done, was in violation of no existing law; a law that destroys, or impairs, the lawful private contracts of citizens; a law that makes a man a judge in his own cause; or a law that takes property from A and gives it to B. It is against all reason and justice for a people to intrust a Legislature with such powers; and, therefore, it cannot be presumed that they have done it. The genius, the nature and the spirit, of our State Government, amount to a prohibition of such acts of legislation; and the general principles of law and reason forbid them. The legislature may enjoin, permit, forbid, and punish; they may declare new crimes, and establish rules of conduct for all its citizens in future cases; they may command what is right, and prohibit what is wrong; but they cannot change innocence into guilt; or punish innocence as a crime; or violate the right of an antecedent lawful private contract; or the right of private property. To maintain that our Federal, or State, Legislature possesses such powers, if they had not been expressly restrained, would, in my opinion, be a political heresy altogether inadmissible in our free republican governments. — Opinion of Justice Chase in Calder v. Bull, 3 Dallas 386-389 (1798).

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Posted by:
CDR Charles Kerchner (Ret)
Pennsylvania USA
Lead Plaintiff
Kerchner et al v Obama/Congress/Pelosi et al
http://www.protectourliberty.org
http://puzo1.blogspot.com
####

October 8, 2010

Absolute proof the Founders knew and accepted Vattel`s French "naturels" to mean "natural born"

Absolute proof the Founders knew and accepted Vattel`s French “naturels” to mean “natural born”

by: Teo the Bear @ http://www.thebirthers.org


Found in the Library of Congress Website

If you look at Article III in the body of the text below, you will see,

Les consuls et vice consuls respectifs ne pourront être pris que parmi les sujets naturels de la puissance qui les nommera. Tous seront appointés par leur souverain respectif, et ils ne pourront en conséquence faire aucun trafic ou commerce quelconque ni pour leur propre compte, ni pour le compte d’autrui.

Going down further to the end you will find under number 3,

The respective Consuls and Vice Consuls shall only be taken from among the natural born subjects of the power nominating them. They shall all be appointed by their respective Sovereign, and in Consequence of such appointment they shall not exercise any traffic or commerce whatsoever either on their own account, or on account of any other

Translation by Charles Thomson secretary of the Continental Congress

This is pretty convincing proof that the framers did not need to wait for the 1797 translated edition of Vattel’s Law of Nations. It appears they were well apt to translate it themselves. This accepted translation of ‘naturel’ in 1781, predates John Jay’s 1787 letter to George Washington by 6 years.

[Comment by CDR K: This ‘naturels’ means ‘natural born’ translation in 1781 was subsequently confirmed by the 1797 translation of the part of the relevant sentence and paragraph in Vattel’s Law of Nation, Vol.1, Chapter 19, Section 212, that is, “natural-born Citizens, are those born in the country, to parents who are citizens”. Many of the founders and framers were fluent in French since it was the diplomatic language of that time. Thus when the founders and framers wrote the Constitution in 1787 they clearly knew what “natural born Citizen” meant when they upgraded the Citizenship requirement in Article II from simply being a “born Citizen” as proposed by Hamilton to that of being a “natural born Citizen” as recommended by Jay as a strong check against foreign influence on the persons in the future who would be President and Commander of the military. And that meaning was understood to be a person born in the country to parents who are Citizens of the country. Such a person has sole allegiance and unity of citizenship at birth to only the United States. That was the intent of the founders and framers for that legal term of art, natural born Citizen, in Article II, Section 1, Clause 5 of the U.S. Constitution. This restriction on the type of Citizen who could be President was a national security issue to them back then and it is still a national security issue to us now.]

From the Library of Congress

Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789
FRIDAY, JULY 27, 1781

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Link to date-related documents.

A memorial from the honorable. the Minister of France was read, accompanied with the plan of a convention for regulating the powers and duties of consuls and vice consuls.

MEMOIRE

Philadelphia, July 26, 1781.

The twenty-ninth article of the treaty of amity and commerce, between his Most Christian Majesty and the United States, reserves to the two contracting powers “the liberty of having each in the ports of the other, consuls, vice consuls, agents and commissaries, whose functions shall be regulated by a particular agreement.” In consequence of this stipulation, the Court of Versailles has caused a draft to be made of a convention, relative to the establishment of consuls, which the undersigned minister plenipotentiary of France has the honour to communicate to Congress. It is the desire of his Majesty, that this draft should be examined by Congress; and those points marked which admit of no difficulty; and that the others should be submitted to the examination of delegates appointed by both parties, who may make such observations as they shall judge proper, and propose such alterations as they may think convenient. These objects will require discussion in repeated conferences; and the undersigned intreats that Congress would determine in what manner these conferences shall be held. The proposed convention requires the most mature consideration of both parties; while at the same time it is equally the interest of both, with all speed, to introduce consistency and uniformity into their respective commercial establishments; and the undersigned is of opinion that Congress will think it


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necessary to prosecute this business with all possible despatch.

(Signed)Le Chev. de la Luzerne.1

[Note 1: 1 This version is taken from the printed Secret Journal, Foreign Affairs; it is also printed in the Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution (Wharton), IV, 604. Another translation is in the Papers of the Continental Congress, No. 25, II, folio 17.]

Projet de Convention entre le Roi Très Chértien, et les Etats Unis de l’Amérique Septentrionale, à l’effet de déterminer et fixer les fonctions et prérogatives des Consuls, Vice Consuls, et des Agens respectifs.

Le roi très chrétien, et les Etats Unis de l’Amérique Septentrionale, s’étant accordés, mutuellement, par l’article 29 du traité d’amitié et de commerce conclu entre eux, la faculté de tenir dans leurs états respectifs, des consuls, vice consuls, et des agens, et voulant en conséquence déterminer, et fixer d’une maniére réciproque et permanente les fonctions et prérogatives des dits consuls, vice consuls, et des agens respectifs, il a été convenu ce qui suit.

ARTICLE I

Les consuls, et vice consuls nommés par le roi très chrétien, et les Etats Unis, seront tenus de présenter leurs provisions à leur artivée dans leurs états respectifs. On leur délivrera, sans aucun frais, l’exequatur nécessaire à l’exercice de leurs fonctions et sur l’exhibition qu’ils feront du dit exequatur, les gouverneurs, présidens, commandans, chefs de justice, les corps des tribunaux ou autres officiers, ayant autorité dans les ports et lieux de leur consulats, les y feront jouit, aussitot, et sans difficulté, des pré-éminences, autorité et priviléges accordés réciproquement sans qu’ils puissent


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exiger des dits consuls, et vice consuls aucun droit sous aucun prétexte quelconque.

ARTICLE II

Les consuls respectifs auront la faculté d’établir des vice consuls dans les différens ports et lieux de leur département ou le besoin l’éxigera. On leur délivrera également l’exequatur nécessaire à l’exercice de leurs fonctions et sur l’exhibition qu’ils feront du dit exequatur ils seront admis et reconnus dans les termes et selon les pouvoirs, autorité et priviléges stipulés par les articles 1, 5, et 6, de la présente convention.

ARTICLE III

Les consuls et vice consuls respectifs ne pourront être pris que parmi les sujets naturels de la puissance qui les nommera. Tous seront appointés par leur souverain respectif, et ils ne pourront en conséquence faire aucun trafic ou commerce quelconque ni pour leur propre compte, ni pour le compte d’autrui.

ARTICLE IV

Les consuls respectifs pourront établir des agens dans les différens ports et lieux de leur département, où le besoin l’éxigera. Les agens pourront être choisis parrot les négocians nationaux ou étrangers et taunts de brevets de l’un des dits consuls; ils se renfermeront respectivement à rendre aux commerçans, navigateurs, et batimens respectifs, tous les services possibles et informer le consul ou vice consul le plus proche des besoins des dits commerçans, navigateurs et batimens, sans que les dits agens puissent autrement participer


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aux immunités, droits et privilèges attribués aux consuls et vice consuls par la présente convention.

ARTICLE V

Les consuls et vice consuls, les officiers du consulat, et généralement toutes les personnes attachées aux fonctions consulaires jouiront respectivement d’une pleine et entière immunité pour leurs personnes, leurs papiers, et leurs maisons. Ils seront exempts de tout service personnel et offices publics, logement de gens de guerre, milice, guet, garde, tutelle, curatelle, ainsi que de tous droits, taxes, impositions, charges quelconques, hors les biens fonds, dont ils seront propriètaires, les quels seront assujettis aux taxes imposées sur les biens de tous autres particuliers. Ils pourront faire placer sur la porte extérieure de leur maison les armes de leur souverain, sans cependant que cette marque distinctive puisse donner à la dire maison le droit d’azile pour aucun malfaiteur ou criminel de manière que Ie cas arrivant oû aucun malfaiteur ou criminel s’y refugierait il sera rendu sur le champ à la première réquisition et sans difficulté.

ARTICLE VI

Les consuls ou les vice consuls respectifs, dans les lieux ou il n’y aura pas de consuls pourront avoir dans leur maison une chapelle pour y célébrer le service divin, et le roi très chrétien ainsi que les Etats Unis, donneront des ordres précis et effectifs dans les ports et lieux de leur domination pour qu’il ne soit apporté aucun retard ni empêchement lors de la cérémonie, des obséques et funérailles des sujets de l’une des deux nations, qui seront décédés dans l’étendue des terres de l’autre.


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ARTICLE VII

Dans tous les cas généralement quelconques concernant la police ou l’administration de la justice, oû il sera nécessaire d’avoir une déclaration juridique des consuls et vice consuls respectiffs, le gouverneur, le commandant, le chef de la justice, les corps des tribunaux ou autres officiers quelconques de leur résidence respective y ayant autorité, seront tenus de les en prévenir en leur écrivant, ou en leur envoyant un officier militaire ou civil, pour leur faire connoître, soit l’objet que l’on se propose soit la nécessité dans la quelle on se trouve d’aller chez eux pour leur demander cette déclaration, et les dits consuls, ou vice consuls seront tenus de leur côté de se prêter loyalement à ce qu’on désirera d’eux dans ces occasions.

ARTICLE VIII

Les consuls, et vice consuls respectifs, pourront établir une chancellerie ou seront déposés les actes et les dé1iberations consulaires, tous les effets délaissés par défunts, ou sauvés des naufrages, ainsi que les testamens, obligations, contrats, et généralement tous les actes et procédures faits, entre leurs nationaux. Ils pourront en conséquence commettre à l’exercice de la dire chancellerie des personnes capables les recevoir; leur faire prêter serment, leur donner la garde du sçeau, et le droit de sceller les commissions, jugemens, et autres actes du consular, ainsi que d’y remplir les fonctions de notaires et greffiers.

ARTICLE IX.

Les consuls, et vice consuls respectifs auront le droit exclusif de recevoir dans leur chancellerie, ou abord


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des bâtimens, les dàclarations et tous les autres actes, que les capitaines, patrons, équipages passagers, et nàgotians, de leur nation, voudront y passer, même leur testamens et autres dispositions de derniere volonté, et les expèditions des dits actes duement légalisées par les dits consuls ou vice consuls et munis du sçeau de leur consulat feront foi, en justice, dans tous les tribunaux de France, et des Etats Unis. Ils auront aussi, et exclusivement, le droit de faire l’inventaire, la liquidation, et de procéder à la vente des effets mobiliers de la succcession des sujets de leur nation qui viendront mourir dans les états respectifs. Ils y procéderont avec l’assistance de deux négotians de leur dite nation, leur choix, et feront déposer dans leur chancellerie les effets, et papiers, des dites successions, sans qu’aucun des officiers militaires, de justice, ou de police, du pays puissent les y troubler, ni y intervenir de quelque manière que ce soit: Mais les dits consuls et vice consuls ne pourront faire la déivrance, des successions et de leur produit aux héritiers légitimes où à leurs mandataires, qu’après avoir fait acquitter toutes les dettes que les défunts auront pu avoir contractées dans le pays par jugement, par actes, ou par billets dont l’écriture et la signature seront reconnues et certifiées, par deux notables négotians de la nation des dits défunts, et dans tous autres cas le payement des dettes ne pourra être ordnné qu’en donnant, par le créancier, caution suffisante, et domiciliée de rendre les sommes induëment peréues, principal, interéts, et frais, lesquelles cautions cependant, demeureront duëment déchargées apràs une année en terns de paix, et deux en terns de guerre; si la demande en décharge ne peut êtré formée avant ces dé1ais contre les héritiers qui si présenteront.


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ARTICLE X

Les consuls et vice consuls respectifs, recevront les déclarations, et les consulats de tous capitaines et patrons de leur nation respective, pour raison d’avaries essuyées à la mer par des voyes d’eau ou jets de marchandise, même lorsqu’il y aura des négotians étrangers intéréssés dans la cargaison; ou ces capitaines et patrons remettront dans la chancellerie des dits consuls et vice consuls les consulats qu’ils auront faits dans autres ports pour les accidens, qui leur seront arrives pendant leur voyage; et dans les deux cas, les dits consuls et vice consuls respectifs, régleront l’avarie sans délai par des experts, de leur nation qu’ils nommeront d’office; et par des experts d’une partie de leur nation et l’autre d’étrangers dans le cas ou un étranger sera interessé dans la cargaison.

ARTICLE XI

Dans le cas ou par tempête, ou autre accident, des vaisseaux ou batimens François échöueront sur les côtes des Etats Unis, et des vaisseaux ou batimens des Etats Unis echöueront sur les côtes de France, le consul ou le vice consul le plus proche du lieu de naufrage pourra faire tout ce qu’il jugera conyenable tant pour sauver le dit vaisseau ou batiment, son chargement et appartenances, que pour le magazinage et la sureté des effets sauvés et marchandises: Il pourra en faire l’inventaire sans qu’aucun officiers militaires, des douanes, de la justice, ou de la police du pays puissent s’y immiscer autrement que pour faciliter aux consuls, et vice consuls, capitaine et équipage du vaisseau naufragé, ou échoué, tous les secours et faveurs qu’ils leur demanderont, soit pour la célérité et la sureté du sauvetage, et des effets sauvés, soit pour éviter les désordres qui


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n’accompagnent que trop souvent ces accidents. Pour prévenir même toute espàce de conflit et de discussion dans les dits cas de naufrage, il a été convenu, que lors qu’il ne se trouvera pas de consul ou de vice consul pour fairs travailler au sauvetage, ou que la résidence du dit consul ou vice consul qui ne se trouvera pas sur le lieu du naufrage, sera plus éloignée du dit lieu que celle du juge territorial compétent, ce dernier y fera procéder sur le champ avec toute célérité, la sureté et les précautions prescrites par les loix respectives, sauf au dit juge territorial à se retirer; le consul ou vice consul survenant, et à lui remettre les procédures par lui faites, dont le consul ou vice consul lui fera rembourser les frais. Les marchandises sauvées devront étre déposées à la douane la plus prochaine avec l’inventaire qui en aura été dressé par le consul ou vice consul, ou en leur absence par le juge qui en aura connu; pour, les dites marchandises, être ensuite délivrées, aprés le pré1evement des frais et sans forme de procès aux proprietaires, qui munis de la main levée du consul ou vice consul le plus prochain les réclameront par eux mêmes ou par leur mandataires; soit pour reporter les marchandises, et dans ce cas elles ne payeront aucune espàce de droit de sortie; soit pour les vendre dans le pays, si elles n’y sont pas prohibées, et dans ce cas, les dites marchandises se trouvant avariées on leur accordera une modération sur les droits d’entrée proportionée au domage souffert, lequel sera constaté par le procè verbal dressé lors du naufrage et de l’échouement.

ARTICLE XII

Les consuls et vice consuls du roi très chrétien, ètablis dans les Etats Unis, et les consuls et vice consuls des Etats Unis ètablis en France, y exerceront la police sur


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tous les batimens de leurs nations respectives et auront abord des dits batimens tout pouvoir et jurisdiction dans toutes les discussions qui pourront y survenir. Ils auront une entiàre inspection sur les dits batimens, leurs équipages, les changemens, et les remplacemens à y faire, ainsi que pour tout ce qui concernera leur navigation, et l’observation de leurs loix, ordonnances, réglemens respectifs. Ils pourfont se transporter abord des batimens de leur nation arrivant dans les ports, havres ou fades respectifs, et ce aussi souvent qu’ils le jugeront apropos pour l’acquit de leur charge sans qu’aucun officiers des douanes, de police, ou autres puissent les en empêcher. Ils pourront faire arrêter tout batiment portant le pavillon de leur nation respective, le faire séquestrer, et même, le renvoyer respectivement de France dans les Etats Unis et des Etats Unis en France, et faire arrêter sans difficulté tout capitaine patron, matelot ou passager de leur dire nation respective. Ils pourront réclamer les matelots, déserteurs, et les vagabonds de leur nation respective, les faire arrêter et détenir dans le pays ou les renvoyer et faire transporter hors du pays. Il suffira que les consuls ou vice consuls respectifs, puissent justifier que ces matelots, déserteurs et vagabonds de telle nation qu’ils puissent être d’ailleurs, sont inscrits, sur leur registre ou portés sur le rôle de l’équipage, et l’une ou l’autre de ces deux pièces étant suffisantes pour fonder la validité de la réclamation, de la détention, et de la déportation des dits matelots, déserteurs, et vagabonds, aucun d’iceux, François ou Américain ne pourra dans les pays respectifs par lui même ou par autrui réclamer les loix ou l’autorité locale, interdisant sur ce toute connoissance à tous tribunaux, juges et officiers quelconques. Dans tous ces cas, les dits matelots, déserteurs et vagabonds seront


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remis aux réclamants, quelques soient leurs engagements, et ils ne pourront devenir engagés, retenus ou soustraits en aucune maniàre quelconque et par qui ce soit, nationaux ou étrangers à la perquisition que les dits consuls ou vice consuls, en feront faire par personnes autorisées par eux et chargées d’une réquisition signée d’eux; et pour l’éxécution de toutes les dispositions ce dessus les gouverneurs, commandans, chefs de la justice, les corps des tribunaux ou autres officiers des pays respectifs y ayant autorité, seront tenus et obliges de préter main forte aux consuls et vice consuls respectifs et sur une simple réquisition signée d’eux sauf à faire arrêter, détenir et garder dans les prisons à la disposition et aux frais des dits consuls et vice consuls, les matelots, déserteurs, et les vagabonds réclames jusqu’ à ce qu’ils ayent occasion de les faire embarquer et sortir du pays. Et si les dits matelots, déserteurs, et vagabonds dans la vue d’éluder leur renvoi alliguaient qu’ils veulent retourner à leur patrie pour devenir sujets de S. M. T. C. ou des Etats Unis, respectivement, on n’aura aucun égard à cette assertion.

ARTICLE XIII

Dans les cas ou les sujets respectifs auront commis quelque crime contre quelqu’un des habitans du pays, qui mérite punition exemplair, ils seront justiciables des juges du pays.

ARTICLE XIV

Les consuls et vice consuls du roi T. C. ètablis dans les Etats Unis, et les consuls et vice consuls des Etats Unis ètablis en France, y connoîtront, à l’exclusion des tribunaux du pays, de tous les différens et procès, qui pourront naître à terre entre les capitaines, patrons,


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équipages, passagers et commçerans de leur nation respective. Ils les accorderont amiablement ou les jugeront sommairement, et sans frais, pour l’appel de leur jugemens être porté respectivement aux tribunaux de France et des Etats Unis, qui jugent en dernier ressort, et qui devront en connoître. Ils exerceront ces fonctions de justice, priveé, ou de police nécessaire sans qu’aucun des officiers militaires, de justice ou de police du pays, puissent s’y immiscer et y intervenir en aucune manière. Dans tous les cas ou il surviendra aussi entre les négotians François demeurant en France, et leur compatriotes établis ous la protection du roi très chrérien dans les Etats Unis, des différens procès pour raison de leur commerce, ainsi qu’il en surviendra de même entre les négotians Américains domiciliés dans les Etats Unis, et leurs compatriotes établés sous la protection des Etas Unis dans le royuame de France, pareillement pour raison de leur commerce, les dits différens et procès seront insfruits et jugés, sommairement et sans frais, entre eux, chacun par le consul ou vice consul de leur nation respective et les appels du jugement portés aux tribunaux respectifs qui jugent en dernier ressort, soit en France, soit dans les Etats Unis. A l’égard des autres différens et procès, qui pourront naître entre les sujets du roi T. C. et ceux des Etats Unis, dans les etats respectifs, soit comme demandeurs, soit comme défendeurs, les uns envers les autres tant a l’occasion des fournitures, marchès, trafic, qu’ils feront ensembles, et des soldes qui en résulteront, que des lettres de change, assurances, avaries, faillities et de toutes autres causes civiles, et criminelles, relatives au commerce, ils seront portés dans le pays devant les tribunaux que devront en connoître en première instance et par appel, sans que sous aucune prétexte les consuls et vice consuls respectifs putssent s’y immiscer en aucune manière.


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ARTICLE XV

L’utilité générale du commerce ayant fait établir en France des tribunaux et des formes particulières pour accélérer la décision des affaires de commerce, les négotians Américains jouiront du bénéfice de ces établissemens en France, et les Etats Unis procureront des avantages équivalents et coincidents avec ces tribunaux et ces formes en faveur des négotians François dans les affaires de même nature.

ARTICLE XVI

Les sujets du roi très chrétien, et ceux des Etats Unis, qui justifieront être du corps de la nation respective, le certificat du consul ou vice consul du district faisant mention de leurs noms, surnoms, et du lieu de leur établissement comme inscrits dans les registres du consulat, ne pourront perdre pour telle cause que ce soit dans les domaines et états respectifs, la qualité de sujets du pays dont ils sont originaires, conformement à l’article 11 du traité d’amitié et de commerce du 6 Fevrier 1778, dont les présent article servira d’interprétation en cas de besoin; et les dits sujets respectifs jouiront, en conséquence, de l’exemption de tous services personnels dans le lieu de leur établissement, et en outre, ils ne pourront y être assujettis à aucune taxe relative à l’industrie.

ARTICLE XVII

Toutes les stipulations ci dessus fondées sur une exacte réciprocité, serviront dorénavant de regles, fixes, et invariables pour tous les objets, sur lesquels elles portent; mais si quelque autre nation conserve ou acquiert à tel titre que ce soit, ou en vertu d’une convention quelconque, un traitement plus favorable soit en


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France, soit dans les Etats Unis, relativement aux consuls, vice consuls et agens, et à leur pré-éminences, pouvoirs, autorité et priviléges, les consuls, vice consuls et agens du roi très chrétien dans les Etats Unis, et les consuls, vice consuls et agens des Etats Unis en Frances y participeront aux termes stipulés par l’article 11 du dit traité d’amitié et de commerce conclu entre le roi très chrétien et les Etats Unis.

ARTICLE XVIII

Les ratifications de la présente convention, seront données en bonne forme et échangées de part et d’autre dans l’espace de six mois, ou plutôt si faire se peut.

En roy de quoi, &c.

Conforme à l’original resté par devers nous.

Le Chevalier de la Luzerne.

A Philadelphie le 24 Juillet, 1781.1

[Note 1: 1 This memorial and plan of convention were entered only in the manuscript Secret Journal, Foreign Affairs. The following translation, in Charles Thomson’s hand, was the paper considered by Congress. It is in the Papers of the Continental Congress, No. 25, II, folio 21.
[Translation]
A Plan of a Convention
Between the Most Christian King and the United States of North America, for the purpose of determining and fixing the functions and prerogatives of their respective Consuls, Vice Consuls and Agents.
The Most Christian King and the thirteen United States of North America, having mutually granted to each other by the 29 article of the Treaty of Amity and Commerce concluded between them the power of keeping in their respective States Consuls, Vice Consuls and agents, and being willing in consequence thereof to determine and fix in a lasting manner, and on terms of equality the functions and prerogatives of the said Consuls, Vice Consuls and Agents, have agreed as follows:
ARTICLE 1
The Consuls and Vice Consuls named by the Most Christian King and the United States, shall be obliged to present their appointments on their arrival in the respective States, and there shall be delivered to them the exequatur necessary for the exercise of their functions, and upon the exhibition which they shall make of that exequatur, the Governors, Presidents, Commandants, Chief Judges, Magistrates of the place tribunals and other officers exercising authority in the ports and places of their Consulships shall cause them to enjoy there immediately and without difficulty the preéminences authority and privileges mutually granted, without exacting from the said Consuls and Vice Consuls any duty or emoluments, under any pretext whatsoever.
2
The Respective Consuls shall have power to establish Vice Consuls in the different Ports and places within their departments, where necessary: There shall in like manner be delivered to them the exequator necessary for the exercise of their functions, and upon the exhibition which they shall make of the said exequatur, they shall be admitted and recognized in the terms and according to the Powers, authority and privileges stipulated by the 1, 5, and 6 articles of this present Convention.
3
The respective Consuls and Vice Consuls shall only be taken from among the natural born subjects of the power nominating them. They shall all be appointed by their respective Sovereign, and in Consequence of such appointment they shall not exercise any traffic or commerce whatsoever either on their own account, or on account of any other
4
The respective Consuls shall have power to establish agents in the different Ports and places within their department where necessary. These agents may be chosen from among the Merchants of their nation or strangers, and shall be furnished with a Commission from one of the said Consuls, and shall respectively Be authorized to render to their respective merchants seamen and vessels all possible service, and to inform the nearest Consul or Vice Consul of the wants of the said merchants, seamen and vessels; but the said agents shall not in any respect participate in the immunities, rights and privileges granted to Consuls and Vice Consuls by the present Convention. Nor shall they exact any duty by virtue of their appointment under any pretence whatsoever.
5
The Consuls and Vice Consuls the officers of the consulship and generally all persons attached to the Consular functions shall respectively enjoy a full and entire immunity for their persons papers and houses. They shall be exempted from all personal service, and public offices, from finding quarters for soldiers, from militia duties, from watch, ward, guardianship curatelle, and from all duties, taxes, imposts and charges whatsoever, save on real estates which they shall own, which shall be subject to the Taxes imposed on the estates of all other individuals. They shall be at liberty to fix upon the outer door of their house the arms of their Sovereign, provided always that this mark of distinction, shall not give to the said house the right of asylum to any malefactor or criminal, who shall take refuge there; but he shall be immediately delivered up on the first requisition and without any difficulty.
6
The Most Christian King and also the United States, shall give precise and effectual orders in the ports and places within their jurisdiction, that no let or hindrance be given to the funeral rites and obsequies of any subject of the one or the other nation, who shall die within the territories of the other.
7
In all cases, generally whatever respecting the police and administration of justice, where it shall be necessary to have a judicial declaration of the said Consuls and Vice Consuls respectively, the Governor, President, Commandant, Chief Judges Magistrates of the place, tribunals or other officers whatever at their respective residence or Consulate having authority there shall be bound to give them notice thereof in writing r by sending to them a civil or military officer to inform them of the object in view and the necessity there is of going to them, and demanding from them that declaration, and the said Consuls and Vice Consuls, shall be bound on their part, readily and bona fide to do what shall be required of them on those occasions.
8
The respective Consuls and Vice Consuls shall have power to establish a Chancery, for depositing the Consular acts and deliberations, the effects left by persons deceased or saved from shipwreck, also the testaments, obligations, contracts, and in general all the acts and proceedings made and done by or between people of their nation. They shall of consequence have power to appoint capable persons to manage that Chancery, to admit them into office, to administer an oath to them, to give them the keeping of the Seal, and the right of sealing the Commissions, judgements and other acts of consulship and also to execute the office of Notaries and scribes.
9
The respective Consuls and Vice Consuls shall have the exclusive right of receiving in their Chancery or on board of vessels the declarations and all other acts, which the captains, masters, seamen, passengers and merchants of their nation shall be willing to give there, and their testament and other dispositions of a last will, and the copies of the said acts duly authenticated by the said Consuls or Vice Consuls, and under the seal of their Consulship shall be admitted in all Courts of Justice in France and the United States. They shall also have the exclusive right of making inventories and liquidating accounts and of proceeding to the sale of the personal effects left by the subjects of their nation who shall happen to die in the respective States. They shall proceed therein, with the assistance of two merchants of their said nation whom they shall choose and shall cause to be deposited in their Chancery the effects and papers of the said successions, nor shall any officer civil or military, of justice, or of the police of the Country be allowed to give them any interruption or disturbance whatever. But the said Consuls and Vice Consuls, shall not be at liberty to deliver up the property or the produce thereof, to the lawful heirs or their attorneys, until they have caused to be discharged all the debts which the deceased may have contracted in the Country by judgment by acts or by bills, the writing and signature of which shall be proved and certified by two noted merchants of the nation of the said deceased, and in all other cases the payment of debts shall not be ordained, but upon the creditors giving sufficient security by a Bondsman resident there, to return the sums unduly received, both principal interest and costs, which securities however shall be duly discharged after one year in time of peace, and after two years in time of war, if a demand in discharge cannot before that time be made against the heirs who shall appear.
10
The respective Consuls and Vice Consuls shall receive the declarations and protests of all Captains and Masters of their respective nations on account of damages at sea by leakage or throwing goods overboard, even though Foreign Merchants are interested in the Cargo; or the Captains and masters shall lodge in the Chancery of the said Consuls and Vice Consuls the protests, which they shall make in other Ports on account of the accidents that have happened to them during their voyage; and in both cases the said Consuls and Vice Consuls respectively shall settle the damage without delay by experienced persons of their nation whom they shall name ex officio and by experienced persons equally of each nation, where a stranger is interested in the cargo.
11
In case either by tempest or other accident, the ships or vessels of France shall be wrecked on the Coast of the United States, or the ships or vessels of the United States shall be wrecked on the Coast of France, the Consul or Vice Consul nearest to the place of shipwreck, shall have power to do whatever he shall judge proper, as well for saving the ship or vessel, her cargo and appurtenances as for storing and securing the effects and merchandize saved. tie shall have power to take an inventory of them, nor shall any military officers nor officers of the Customs, or naval officers nor officers of Justice or of the police of the Country be allowed to interfere farther than by affording to the Consuls and Vice Consuls, the Captain and Crew of the vessel wrecked or stranded all the assistance and favour required of them either for the speedily saving and securing the effects, or for preventing the disorders, which too frequently accompany such accidents, to prevent all Interference of jurisdictions in case of shipwrecks, it is agreed that where there is no Consul or Vice Consul to assist in saving the wreck, or where the residence of the said Consul or Vice Consul not being at the place shall be farther distant than that of a competent territorial judge, this latter shall immediately promote with all expedition, the saving the wreck and the measures prescribed by their respective laws, provided always, that the Territorial Judge shall retire upon the coming of the Consul or Vice Consul, to whom he shall transfer the whole and commit the farther prosecution of the measures by him taken and the Consul or Vice Consul shall reimburse him the expences incurred. The merchandize saved shall be deposited in the nearest custom house or other nearest place of security, if there shall be no custom house, with an inventory made out by the Consul or Vice Consul, or in their absence by the judge who shall have had cognizance thereof, in order that the said merchandizes may after payment of the expence be afterwards delivered without any formal process to the owners, who being furnished with a release from the nearest Consul or Vice Consul shall reclaim them in person or by attorney, either for the purpose of reexporting the merchandizes, in which case they shall not pay any kind of duties on exportation, or for the purpose of selling them in the country, if they are not there prohibited, and in this case the said merchandize being damaged an abatement shall be made on the import duties proportioned to the damage suffered, which shall be determined by the verbal process stated at the time of the wreck or stranding.
12
The Consuls and Vice Consuls of the Most Christian King established in the United States, and the Consuls and Vice Consuls of the United States in France, shall there exercise the police over all the vessels of their respective nations, and shall have on board the said vessels all power and jurisdiction in all discussions which can arise there. They shall have the entire inspection over the said vessels, their crews, the changes and the recompenses for making them, and also for whatever shall concern their navigation, and the observance of their respective laws ordinances and regulations.
They shall be at liberty to go on board the vessels of their nation arriving in the respective ports havens and roads, and that as often as they shall judge necessary for the performance of their office, nor shall any officers of the customs, or of the police or any other persons whatever prevent them.
They shall be at liberty to arrest and sequester all the vessels carrying the flag of their respective nation, and even to send them back respectively from France to the United States, and from the United States to France, and to arrest without any difficulty every captain master, seaman or passenger of their respective nation.
They shall be at liberty to reclaim sailors, deserters and the vagabonds of their respective nation, and to arrest and detain them in the country or to send them away and cause them to be transported out of the country: It shall be sufficient that the Consuls or Vice Consuls respectively can prove that the sailors, deserters and vagabonds, of what nation soever they be are inserted in the registers, or entered on the roll of the crew, and the one or other of these two pieces being sufficient to establish the validity of the claim and detention and of the transportation of the said seamen, deserters and vagabonds, none of them whether French or American shall in the respective countries either by himself or others, be at liberty to claim the benefit of the laws or authority of the country, all tribunals, judges and officers whatsoever being interdicted from all cognizance thereof. In all these cases, the said seamen, deserters and vagabonds shall be delivered to the reclaimers, whatever may be their engagements, and they shall not be engaged, detained or withdrawn in any manner, or by any person whatever, whether natives or foreigners, upon the requisition which the said Consuls or Vice Consuls shall cause to be made by persons authorised by them and entrusted with the requisition signed by them.
And for the execution of all the regulations above-mentioned, the governors, commandants, chief judges, magistrates of the place, tribunals, and other officers of the respective countries having authority there, shall be held and bound to assist the respective Consuls and Vice Consuls, and upon a simple requisition signed by them, saving the power of arresting, to detain and keep in prison, at the disposal and cost of the said Consuls and Vice Consuls, the sailors, deserters and vagabonds reclaimed, until they shall have an opportunity of putting them on board and sending them out of the country.
13
In case the subjects respectively shall commit any crime against any inhabitants of the country which deserves exemplary punishment, they shall be tried by the judges of the country.
14
The Consuls and Vice Consuls of the Most Christian King established in the United States, and the Consuls and Vice Consuls of the United States established in France shall to the exclusion of the tribunals of the country have cognizance there of all differences and processes which shall arise on land between the captains, masters, crews, passengers and traders of their respective nations. They shall settle them in an amicable manner, or decide them summarily and without costs, and the appeal from their judgments shall be carried respectively to the tribunals of France and the United States, that judge in the last resort and that ought to have cognizance thereof. They shall exercise these offices of private justice and of necessary police, nor shall any military officer, nor any officer of justice or of police in the country intermeddle or interpose in any manner whatever.
In case any differences or suits on account of their commerce shall happen either between French merchants living in France and their countrymen settled under the protection of the most Christian King in the United States, or between the American merchants dwelling in the United States and their countrymen settled under the protection of the United States in the Kingdom of France, the said differences and suits shall be brought to trial and decided between them in a summary way and without expence by the Consul or Vice Consul of their respective nation, and the appeals from their judgment shall be to the respective tribunals which judge in the last resort, whether in France or in the United States.
With respect to all other differences and suits that may arise between the subjects of the Most Christian King and those of the United States in the respective countries either as plaintiffs or defendents one against another, as well on account of bargains and traffic one with another and the payments to be made in consequence thereof, as for bills of exchange, insurances, damages at sea, bankruptcies, and all other causes civil and criminal relative to commerce, they shall be prosecuted in the country before the tribunals which ought to take cognizance thereof in the first instance and by appeal nor shall the respective Consuls and Vice Consuls under any pretence intermeddle therein in any manner.
15
The general advantage of commerce having given occasion to establish in France certain tribunals and particular forms for the speedy determination of commercial matters, the American merchants shall enjoy the benefits of those establishments in France and the United States shall procure equal advantages coinciding with the tribunals and forms in favor of the French merchants in matters of the same nature.
16
The subjects of the Most Christian King and those of the United States, who shall prove that they are under the laws of their respective nation, the certificate of the Consul or Vice Consul of the district mentioning their names surnames and place of abode as inserted in the registers of the Consulship, shall not for any cause whatever lose in the respective dominions and States, the quality of subjects of the country to which they originally belong, conformably to the 11 article of the treaty of amity and commerce of the 6 Feby. 1778, of which this present article shall serve for an interpretation if occasion require, and the said subjects respectively shall consequently enjoy an exemption from all personal services in the place of their residence and moreover they shall not be subject to any tax relative to labour.
17
All the stipulations abovementioned being founded on an exact reciprocity shall henceforth serve for regulating fixing and rendering invariable all the objects to which they relate. But if any other Nation enjoys, or acquires under any title or in virtue of any convention whatever a more favorable treatment either in France or in the United States with regard to Consuls, Vice Consuls and agents, and their preëminences powers authority and privileges, the Consuls, Vice Consuls and agents of the most Christian King in the United States, and the Consuls, Vice Consuls and agents of the United States in France shall participate therein, agreeably to the terms of the 11 article of the said treaty of amity and commerce, concluded between the Most Christian King and the United States.
18
The ratifications of this present convention shall be delivered in good form and exchanged by one party and by the other in the space of 6 months or sooner if possible In testimony whereof &c. agreeable to the original remaining with us.
Philadelphia the 24th July. 1781.
(Signed)Le Chev. de la Luzerne.]

—————————————————————————–

Posted here by:
CDR Charles Kerchner (Ret)
Lead Plaintiff
Kerchner et al v Obama et al
http://www.protectourliberty.org
####

October 6, 2010

Atty Apuzzo & CDR Kerchner on the Revolution Radio Show hosted by Dr. Kate – Wed, 06 Oct 2010, 9:00 p.m. EST

Atty Mario Apuzzo and CDR Charles Kerchner (Ret) were guests on the Revolution Radio Show hosted by Dr. Kate on Wednesday, 6 Oct 2010, at 9:00 p.m. EST. They discussed the recent filing of a Petition for Writ of Certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court for the Kerchner et al v Obama/Congress/Pelosi et al lawsuit. The Petition can be seen listed on the official Docket of the U.S. Supreme Court . Below is a direct link to a PODCAST of the show and interview by Dr. Kate on BlogTalkRadio.com:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/drkate/2010/10/07/revolution-radio-welcomes-cdr-kerchner-and-attorne

Also stop by and read Dr. Kate’s blog at:
http://drkatesview.wordpress.com/

P.S. A special request from CDR Kerchner:

Also, please cast your votes to Help the Cause to get the word out:

1st: Vote for the show topic for the Judge Andrew Napolitano “Freedom Watch” TV show to be a discussion of the legal term of art, “natural born Citizenship”. Please add your vote (in addition to making a comment if desired) for this new TV Show topic suggested by JTX at the Judge Andrew Napolitano “Freedom Watch” TV show suggestion forum. Go to this link and click on the VOTE button and cast 3 of your 10 votes for the show topic to be “natural born Citizenship”. Don’t just make a comment only. That does not count as a vote. Be sure to VOTE too: http://freedomwatch.uservoice.com/forums/16625-freedom-watch-show-ideas/suggestions/969299-natural-born-citizen-meaning-in-natural-law-s?ref=title

2nd: Vote for Mario to be a guest on Judge Andrew Napolitano’s Freedom Watch TV show: Please add your vote here (in addition to making a comment if desired) to get Attorney Mario Apuzzo on the air with the Judge Andrew Napolitano to discuss this issue. Go to this link and click on the VOTE button and cast 3 of your 10 votes for Mario Apuzzo. Don’t just make a comment only. That does not count as a vote. Be sure to VOTE too: http://freedomwatch.uservoice.com/forums/16626-freedom-watch-guest-suggestions/suggestions/268573-mario-apuzzo-esq-

Charles F. Kerchner, Jr., Commander USNR (Retired)
Lead Plaintiff, Kerchner v Obama & Congress
Please if you can, see this site and help the cause:
http://www.protectourliberty.org
http://puzo1.blogspot.com
####

October 1, 2010

Petition for Writ of Certiorari filed with the U.S. Supreme Court for Kerchner et al vs. Obama/Congress/Pelosi et al Lawsuit

News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
30 September 2010, 8:00 P.M. EDT

CONTACT: Mario Apuzzo, Esq., Jamesburg, New Jersey
http://puzo1.blogspot.com/
Tel: 732-521-1900, Fax: 732-521-3906, Email: apuzzo@erols.com

Petition for Writ of Certiorari filed with the U.S. Supreme Court for Kerchner et al vs Obama/Congress/Pelosi et al Lawsuit

JAMESBURG, NJ – (Sept. 30, 2010) – Attorney Mario Apuzzo of Jamesburg, NJ, today filed a Petition for a Writ of Certiorari with the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington DC, on behalf of plaintiffs, Charles F. Kerchner, Jr., Lehigh County, PA; Lowell T. Patterson, Burlington County, NJ; Darrell J. LeNormand, Middlesex County, NJ; and Donald H. Nelsen, Jr., Middlesex County, NJ. Plaintiffs are challenging the recent decision of the Third Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia, PA, which affirmed the dismissal by District Judge, Jerome Simandle, sitting in the Federal District Court, Camden, NJ, of plaintiffs’ lawsuit in which they charge that Barack Hussein Obama, aka Barry Soetoro, has NOT conclusively proven to any controlling legal authority that he is an Article II, Section 1, Clause 5 “natural born Citizen of the United States” and thus constitutionally eligible to serve as the President and Commander-in-Chief of our military, and that he has hidden all his early life records including his original long-form birth certificate, early school records, college records, travel and passport records needed to prove he is even a born Citizen of the United States

Obama was born a British Subject/Citizen to a British Subject/Citizen father and a U.S. citizen mother. Obama’s father was not a U.S. Citizen and never intended to be one. Obama’s father was never even an immigrant to the USA nor was he even a permanent legal resident. Obama’s father was a foreign national sojourning in the USA to attend college. Obama is still a British Subject/Citizen to this day because he has never renounced that citizenship. According to this lawsuit, Obama was born a dual-citizen with dual allegiance and loyalty and is therefore not constitutionally eligible to be the President and Commander-in-Chief of our military. The founders of our country and framers of our Constitution required the President to have unity of citizenship and sole natural allegiance to the USA from the moment of birth, which Obama does not and cannot have. This was a national security issue to the founders and framers.

Obama has multiple foreign allegiance claims on him because of his British citizenship which also converted to Kenyan citizenship at age 2. Obama was also an Indonesian citizen as a youth when he was adopted or acknowledged by his Indonesian step-father when he married his mother, Stanley Ann Dunham.

The lawsuit seeks a trial on the merits to determine the true facts of Obama’s legal identity and exact citizenship status and to require Obama to prove to the courts that he is eligible for the federal office he sits in per our Constitution, Article II, Section 1, Clause 5, which states: No person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty-five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United States.

The legal term of art, natural born citizen, is defined by the world renowned legal scholar, Emer de Vattel, in his pre-eminent legal treatise and enlightenment to the world of jurisprudence in the revolutionary period, The Lawof Nations or Principles of Natural Law, published in 1758, and which was used by the founders by the Continental Congress during the formation of our country and by the framers of our U.S. Constitution, and whose definition of natural born Citizen is incorporated in several U.S. Supreme Court decisions. Vattel and U.S. Supreme Court decisions agree that a natural born citizen is a person born in the country to two parents who are both citizens of the country. Obama’s father was not a U.S. citizen, nor even an immigrant to the USA. Thus Obama is not a natural born citizen of the USA, and that is the reason for the lawsuit.

The original lawsuit was filed early in the morning of January 20, 2009, before Obama was sworn in. The case was dragged out by delays by the government in addressing the case and deciding on whether the case would proceed to a fact finding trial on the merits or not. The courts have decided that it will not go to the merits and have dismissed the case using technical and procedural tactics to keep the Plaintiffs from getting to the merits of the charges.

By the lower Courts finding that plaintiffs do not have standing and that their claims present a political question, the lower Courts were able to avoid having to address the underlying merits of the Kerchner case. With such a decision, the American People unfortunately still do not know conclusively where Obama was born and whether he is an Article II “natural born Citizen” and therefore constitutionally eligible to be President and Commander in Chief. Being a born “Citizen of the United States” is a necessary part but is NOT sufficient to be an Article II “natural born Citizen of the United States”. We have asked the relevant questions and provided for the U.S. Supreme Court in our Petition various reasons why it should accept this case and promptly resolves this constitutional crisis.

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For a copy of the Petition and more information about the lawsuit see these links:

Petition for Writ of Certiorari filed with the U.S. Supreme Court for Kerchner et al vs. Obama/Congress/Pelosi et al Lawsuit

http://www.scribd.com/doc/19914488/Kerchner-v-Obama-Congress-Table-of-Contents-2nd-Amended-Complaint

http://www.scribd.com/doc/11317148/Kerchner-et-al-v-Obama-Congress-et-al-filed-at-250-am-20Jan2009-2nd-Amendment-filed-09Feb2009

http://www.scribd.com/doc/17748032/Kerchner-v-Obama-Congress-Docket-Report

http://www.scribd.com/doc/22556305/Docket-Report-Kerchner-v-Obama-Congress-U-S-3rd-Circuit-Court-of-Appeals-Philadelphia-PA

http://puzo1.blogspot.com/2009/10/real-kerchner-v-obama-congress-case-is.html

http://puzo1.blogspot.com

http://www.protectourliberty.org

For additional comments or information please contact Mario Apuzzo, Attorney at
Law, 185 Gatzmer Avenue, Jamesburg, NJ, 08831, Tel: 732-521-1900, Fax:
732-521-3906, Email: Apuzzo@erols.com

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